The use of a Psychologist in managing eating behaviours and weight loss: A case study

Coming up to Christmas and New Year with so much food around I though this might be helpful if you want to manage your own eating behaviour. Some people have a good relationship with food, some people only eat when they are hungry and eat a healthy diet, butI I would guess they are in the minority.
So often when people try to lose weight they put most of it back on because they don’t tackle the psychological aspect of eating. Emotional eating is a particular problem. There are so many reasons why we eat and it’s not just that we are hungry, usually they go back to childhood e..g., nice food like sweets and cakes are given to us to make us feel better or loved by our family and friends and so when we a sad, or angry maybe we binge on cakes and chocolate. There are also reasons why people turn to restricting their diet when very depressed.
  • A psychologist can use a short questionnaire (e.g.The Exercisers Eating Scale, TEES) to examine ‘eating behaviour’ (i.e., what we eat), ‘weight management techniques’, ‘dietary responses to emotions’, ‘emotional responses to diet’, & ‘body image’ has been developed (see Lane, 2007). The Psychologist then monitors progress with reassessment being done at regular intervals. Intervention are designed to change diet habits and improve self-regulatory behaviour around food. This client was a 39-year old male who previously competed at national level in his sport, but more recently exercised for health and fitness related reasons. (We screened the athlete for possible indicators of eating disorders first).
  • It is normal for many people, including exercisers to engage in dieting behaviours, but only a few are preoccupied by food or show bulimic tendencies. Our client reported similar scores to the average other than he engaged more in dieting behaviours. and experienced unpleasant emotions after eating, and tended to eat when experiencing unpleasant emotions such as depression and anxiety. He also had a poor body image believing himself to be overweight. Our intervention focused on the diet-emotion link.
  • First we asked him to keep a diary of when he was eating, what he was eating, and what emotions were being experienced. It is important for the individual to be aware of the factors associated with binge eating, particularly if they wish to curtail these behaviours. The process of recording a diary is important as it not only provides the consultant with valuable information, but also helps raise self-awareness of factors that lead to binge eating for the client. E.g., he recalled coming home from work after a bad day, went to gym then binged on a huge amount of food. The reason he binged was because he was unhappy over the incident at work. Now he had named the feelings and expressed where they came from strategies could be identified to help him.
  • We then asked the client to challenge, or question the belief that exercise allows an individual to eat as much as they like. Secondly, we sought to explore the strategies the client was using to regulate pleasant and unpleasant emotions. In this case, his exercise was a strategy to enhance emotions, as was eating unhealthy food. By using a food diary, it was possible to see the type of self-talk that the client was engaging in when deciding what to eat and how much to eat. Information in the diary helped develop self-talk scripts to help the client facing similar situations in the future. It is important for clients to realise that they are active in the decision-making process on whether to binge eat, and self-talk should be targeted at enhancing self-confidence and enabling the use of a different strategy.
  • We asked our client to think back to situations in which he made a decision to eat chocolate, and to explore what he said to himself. He then replayed the scenario and sought to remove the link between eating chocolate and improved mood choosing aa different strategy. e are a number of different strategies that could be used. For example, one method would be to tell someone (partner, friend, mother etc) what your day was like, and develop social support networks. It also helps if you can collate a list of things that work for you and which will help you deal with these emotions and prevent you from binge eating. For example, plan something to keep yourself busy; read a book, go on the computer, go for a walk, go to the movies, phone a friend and organise to meet etc. If you know you have a problem with your diet in the evening then plan to use these strategies at this time. However, it is important to recognise that the strategies people used to control their emotions are highly individualised – there’s no single strategy that can be universally applied. The second key aspect of the use of a diary is to recognise the process through which an individual can be confident enough to take control of decisions around food changes during the intervention.
  • It is important that success is positively reinforced and individuals should seek to reward themselves when they have made a good decision around food. However, this reward should not be linked with food. It is important for the consultant to closely monitor the food diary in the initial stages of the intervention, and encourage the individual to congratulate themselves on their achievements.
  • Over time confidence increases in their ability to make correct decisions around food, they also think less about weight management issues and engaging in dieting behaviours. Furthermore, once food is no longer seen as a primary strategy for emotional regulation, individuals tend to eat a far healthier diet. This trend is evidenced in our case study as depicted.
If you want further help from a Psychologist to help you.
You can contact helenlane@winninglane.com or andylane@winninglane.com
See our website; winninglane.com
Consultancy Sessions are £50 per hour on Skype.

Marathon Talk Run Camp 2018: 23rd-25th February.

On Friday 23rd of February 2018 we arrived at Sandy Balls, Godshill, Foringbridge in The New Forest, Hampshire for the Marathon Run Camp 2018.

We met our fellow camp mate as we were put in lodges with 4 other runners.

After meeting the other runners and drinking at the bar we had a welcome from Martin Yelling and Tom Williams who explained what would be happening in the week-end.Saturday Morning we were all off at 8am to do the Moors Valley parkrun. We woke up to a lovely Sunny but chilly morning ready to run the very beautiful Moors Valley parkrun. A record number of 525 runners took part including over 100 from Marathon Talk Run Camp and from 76 clubs. GB Athletes Liz Yelling and Jo Pavey also took part with everyone. (Photo above: GB Athlete Liz Yelling, Moors Valley parkrun race director/volunteer/race reporter Julie Pegoraro, Melanie Campbell and Olympic Gold Medalist Jo Pavey). The photo below is the Marathon Talk Camp runners.After parkrun as always it was time for coffee, cakes and chatting in the forest cafe and finally returning to Sandy Balls.

A buffet lunch was served followed by a fantastic and interesting Talk by Dr Tim Cruise Drew about his medical support for Eddie Izzard on his Multiple Marathon Challenge in South Africa.In the afternoon we had an optional practical run session in the forest, were we chose a speed group of our choice and did 3 reps of 1km,After dinner in the evening there was a live Q & A session with Jo Pavey, 5 time Olympian and Olympic Gold Medalist. Followed by a group quiz from quiz master Tony Audenshaw.After a brilliant evening Tom Williams and Martin Yelling explained Sunday’s Eliminator Run. It was a team competition where each person had to run the 10 mile course to finish as close to 12 noon as possible where they either wore no watch or there watches were taken off. Points were put on for time finished before noon and double points put on for finishing after noon. The team with the least points won. Everyone predicted their own time and decided to start according to their predicted time.After the Eliminater we all went back to Sandy Balls for another dinner before driving home.

My First Marathon: Stockholm Marathon 1989

I did my first marathon in 1989. I did run at school and stopped like a lot of people, then in my mid 20’s I started running again. I had been living in London for about 3 years and had always kept fit by cycling around London, oblivious to the traffic. I would be petrified to cycle around London now. After a few months of running I decided to do a half marathon. I looked in the Runners World magazine and decided to enter the Watford Half-Marathon. I sent off for the application form, filled it in and sent it back with a cheque and stamped SAE so I could receive the results. Remember this was the ‘back in day’ where online entry didn’t exist (not for me anyway). I did the half-marathon without any problems. Then of course the obvious next thing is to do was a marathon.

I entered the Stockholm Marathon via the same method as before. I must of only done about half a dozen runs until I did my longest which I think could of been as much as 15 miles!! The next day I had a sore knee which lasted about 6-7 weeks, more or less right up until the marathon. As the event came closer, I thought, I can’t chicken out now, I’ve told everyone I’m doing it, accommodation is booked and my cousin had decided to do it as well. For some reason I decided to work in London even the night before. I flew out on the first flight out of Heathrow to Stockholm. I arrive, took a taxi to the park, where my cousin was waiting for me. He had flew from Monte Carlo for the marathon. I think the marathon started at 1pm in the afternoon. I would never do something so daft nowadays, what if the plane was late?

Anyway, the Stockholm Marathon started. It was amazing Bands, Massages, Drinks, Food all as you ran and a fantastic crowd. I can remember crossing lots of bridges and it seemed to be drizzling with rain for a lot of it. By 18 miles I was knackered and my knee was sore, so there was some walking.

Finally, I got to the Stadium at the end before the 5 hour cut off point. My cousin greeted me with “I thought you were never going to get here, I’ve been waiting for ages.”We walked back to where we were staying. Our accommodation was a boat on the river. I was so, so, so tired. My cousin had to push me out to get something for dinner. We had a McDonalds. The next day we flew home. I was shattered and I thought “never again”. I was not fit and it’s not the way to run a marathon. Did I do another marathon?

Book Recommendation: Running Science (Editor, John Brewer)

If I was going to buy someone a running book this Christmas, I would buy this. An increasing number of people are buying E-books rather than hardback books, myself included. However, this is one of the few books I will have on my shelf at home. I enjoy reading it and find it so informative. It explains the Science of Running in a way that anyone can understand. It has large pages, large pictures and large print. It’s also not full of stuff that is not relevant or too academic. My attention span is very short so this is perfect for me. The content is excellent. The format is brilliant. Each page begin with a question and then it is explained. E.g.,

What affects recovery rate after exercise? Can I become a better runner by changing my style? Will supplements improve my running? Will a cup of coffee help me run better? Are Sports Drinks good for me? Can I run through pain? What should I think about when I’m running? How can I keep my mind positive? How much should I increase my Training? What is HIIT and should I be doing it? Is more mileage in training always better? How quickly do I lose fitness if I stop running? Can a heart rate monitor improve performance? Will core strength and stability training keep me injury free? Can sports massage help with injuries or performance? Is running bad for my knees? Will a foam roller make me a better runner?

Authors: John Brewer, Iain Fletcher, Laura Charalambous, Bob Murray, Daniel Craighead, Andy Lane, Charles Pedlar, James Earle, Paul Larkins, Anna Barnsley,

Book Available from Amazon Amazon link for Running Science Book

Book Review: Get Fit, Not Fat, Author: Greg Whyte

This book has been out for a few years. I’ve had mine for a few years. I’ve just noticed the price on Amazon is £7.99, a bargain, it certainly was not that cheap when I got mine. The book explains why we should should exercise but the best thing I find about this book is the large coloured pages with large photo’s of exercises. Probably, about half the content of the book is photo’s of different exercises, i.e., strength exercises, flexibility exercises and balance exercises. It’s ideal for me because I can’t remember what exercises to do and how to do them properly. I pick about 5 exercises for a 15 minutes session. I normally do the exercises ar the gym but it would be perfect for someone who doesn’t belong to a gym. I have thought about buying another to give to my elderly mum and dad and my lazy sister (she hates exercise but 15 minutes is doable) as it has each exercise in three levels, easy, medium and hard.

The book is available on Amazon Link to Get Fit Not Fat

Race Review Draycote Water 10km Race Series: Race 1; October, Race 2 November 2017 (This will be updated every month as results come in).

This is a great event. It is a series that runs every second Sunday of each month from October to March. It is located in Draycote Water, Warwickshire., which has a large lake and the course goes around the lake. If you live in the Midlands I recommend this series, as it’s a pretty course and it’s a longer distance from most other race series. If you are doing a spring marathon then, free parkruns, this series, 1-2 Half-Marathons and a 20 mile Race will set you up perfectly.

It was a windy but a dry day, so fairy good weather for running. Parking was really easy, and picking up numbers was easy too. We left our clothes in the car which was fine, although they had a bag drop too.

Although they advertise this course as easy, flat, I found it had some hills. It was pretty and traffic-free and encompasses a short run and back along the Farborough Dam followed by a lap of the reservoir, starting and finishing close to the country park.

All result time below are chip time. (Click links for more)

Results: Race 1 Sunday 8th of October 2017:Draycote Water 10km Series: Race 1

Men’s:

1. Paul Andrews 35.02

2. Ryan Smith 35.28

3. Lewis Cherry 37.49

Women’s:

1. Louise Andrews 44.31

2. Rachel Smith 46.12

3. Lisa Robertson 47.13

Results: Race 2 Sunday 12th November 2017: Draycote Water 10km Series Race 2.

November

Men’s

1. Paul Andrews 34.30

2. Ben Plummer 34.50

3. Paul Edwards 37.21

Women’s

1. Jess Orion 44.30

2. Louise Andrews 44.48

3. Chloe Kington 45.00

51,307 Started, But How Many Finished? The 2017 NYC Marathon by the Numbers

By Paul Snyder (Runners World).

The race through the five boroughs remains the world’s largest 26.2-mile race.

Runners begin the 2017 New York City Marathon by making their way over the Verrazano Bridge. Photo by, EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ

The 2017 New York City Marathon officially greeted 50,766 runners to the finish line on Sunday in Central Park, and although an impressive 98.9 percent of participants made it 26.2 miles, the total fell short of last year’s record-setting 51,388 finishers.

See more: Runner’s World Link for NYC Marathon.

For complete coverage of this year’s race or to find out how to run the streets of New York in 2018, check out our NYC Marathon hub.

Olympic champion Jemima Sumgong handed four-year doping ban.

By Athletics Weekly (photo by Mark Shearman).

News of the Kenyan’s failed test was reported earlier this year and on Tuesday (November 7) the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya announced her sanction.

Sumgong’s ban runs from April 3, 2017 – the date of her provisional suspension – following the failed out-of-competition drugs test which had been taken on February 28.

That prevented the 32-year-old, who won the Virgin Money London Marathon last year as well as claiming Olympic marathon gold in Rio, from defending her London Marathon title.

According to the decision document published by the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya, Sumgong said her failed test was a result of treatment received at the Kenyatta National Hospital in Kenya on February 22 for an ectopic pregnancy. However, the decision document continued to state that the hospital denied that the athlete had been treated at that facility on or prior to that date, but confirmed a subsequent consultative visit.

A letter from the hospital “asserts quite emphatically that the medical sheets provided by the athlete were not authentic”, the decision document read in part.

It added that Sumgong said she did not disclose the treatment on her doping control form or tell anyone, including her husband who is also her coach, because of the “taboo” associated with her condition.

In April the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) released a statement which read in part: “The athlete tested positive for EPO following a no-notice test conducted by the IAAF in Kenya. This was part of an enhanced IAAF out-of-competition testing programme dedicated to elite marathon runners which is supported by the Abbott World Marathon Majors group.”

Read more at: Jemima Sumgong doping ban. (Athletics Weekly).

British Athletics announces key 2018 event dates and selection conditions. By Athletics Weekly

Governing body says being present at British Championships will be a “mandatory condition” for UK athletes seeking selection for major events

British Athletics has announced key dates for its events in 2018 and also confirmed that athletes seeking British team selection to major championships will be required to be present at British Championships events.

Next year the British Indoor Championships are heading to Birmingham ahead of the IAAF World Indoor Championships, but the event is set to clash with the BUCS Nationals indoor event in Sheffield on the same weekend.

The governing body also confirmed that the Müller Anniversary Games is to return to a two-day format in 2018, while “The Para Meet” will accompany “The Meet” as new fixture at the London Stadium in July.

Key events

February 17-18: British Athletics Indoor Championships

February 25: Müller Indoor Grand Prix Glasgow

June 30 – July 1: British Athletics Championships

July 14: The Para Meet and The Meet

July 21-22: Müller Anniversary Games

August 18: Müller Grand Prix Birmingham

See more at:

Athletics Weekly Selections

Why join an Internet Running Club and/or Online Running Community

Until a few years ago I didn’t know what a internet running club or an online running community was. Why would people even want to join an internet running club or blogging club? The advantages of belonging to one are:

  • They are normally Cheaper than normal running clubs, yet
  • you are affiliated to England Athletics so you still do get discounts on races.
  • You have a chance to win a Club ballot place to run in the London Marathon.
  • You still get support from club members, even though you don’t attend races.
  • You will never get left behind on a club run again!
  • No Club politics problems.

There other appealing aspects, they may differ from each club.

There are quite a few Internet clubs but I’ve only mentioned two; UKnetrunner and UKrunChat as these are the only ones I’m familiar with. My Internet club I belong to is UKnetrunner. It has all the advantages listed about. Once a year, we meet up at a race event and have a big meal afterwards (paid for by the club). This is followed by the Prize Giving (lots of Trophies) and AGM. There are mementos for all sorts of things, e.g., a UKnetrunner mug for all those who ran “5 different parkruns, over an 8 week period”.

UKnetrunner website

“We cater for runners whose lifestyles make it difficult to attend a local running club, but still want the support of clubmates. With UKnetunner your clubmates are available all day, every day, via facebook, twitter and the members’ chat forum.

Our running club offers various ways for members to get involved, but with the flexibility of participating when it suits you – there’s no pressure to attend certain races. You can add all your results to your member profile and these will be used to rank you in the UKnetrunner Grand Prix according to your progress over the previous year. There’s even a prize for the winner at the end of the year.

There are also a variety of handicap races held at events across the country each year. The handicap system allows you to compete fairly against members of all abilities with the triumphant runner receiving a trophy. If you’re still not sure, get in touch and ask any questions you may have before you JOIN.”

I also follow UKrunChat is an Online Running Community that cost nothing to join. It has thousands of followers. It is also your choice to join it as a club athlete so you are a member of England Athletics and you will get discounts on races.

UKrunChat website

“Our community has grown and we have lots of #UKRunChat people meeting up at events each and every week. With this in mind, we decided it was time to take the next step. We are now an official affiliated club with England Athletics. You can read some of the benefits here as to why being affiliated is great for both a club and individuals.  We would also like to affiliate with Scottish and Welsh Athletics.

We already have a virtual place for you to chat, give advice, support one another and celebrate with each other and now you’ll be able to do all of this in person whilst running together as part of the UKRunChat Running Club!

Lots of us for different reasons don’t have time to join a club or you have other commitments which stop you from joining. If you join the UKRunChat running club then you will have your team mates accessible at all times through our usual social channels and can arrange to meet up at events that you want to do offering complete flexibility. This means you are at home and out running when it suits you, your family and your schedule and there is no pressure to attend any races or training sessions that you don’t want to.

You can see where fellow UKRunChat members are running on our race calendar (coming soon) and we will be arranging to run at specific events across the UK so we can all meet up as one club. You can see events on our new events listing.

If you want anymore information then please email info@ukrunchat.co.uk Club Subscription: Free of Charge | England Athletics Affiliation fee: £13 (Optional).”