Dan Robinson in the Frankfurt Marathon 28/10/2018, a bad day at the office.

Dan Robinson.

Dan Robinson works at the University of Wolverhampton where he is available for Performance assessments. You can follow Dan on Twitter at @rungrylikeawolf

Dan runs a variety of distances, from 5km to Ultra’s such as the Comrades. He has spent many years pushing his friends baby around Brueton parkrun and still finishing it in around 16 minutes. Dan trains hard and enjoys it but I sometimes think that he, along with other athletes have signed up to something similar to the add below. Dan describes how everything don’t always go as planned.

“I went into the Frankfurt Marathon with the firm belief that I was in shape to run around 2:25. Training had suggested that this was possible and a couple of key build up races had produced PBs to back that up. At my advanced age I have plenty of experience of marathon build ups and this one was undoubtedly my most consistent and including improvements across all types of sessions”

“The race itself went horribly wrong. Just after breakfast on race day I started to feel not quite right. I convinced myself that this was to be ignored because a) I had made the blandest possible food choices in the previous 48 hours and b) there isn’t much point in doing anything else at that stage. ”

 

“I had planned to run with a good mate and when he said that he wasn’t feeling spectacular either it seemed a reasonable concession to set off slightly more cautiously than planned.”

“So off we went and within 5km were nicely tucked in behind 4 strapping German chaps who were pacing the lead German lady at just under 2:29 pace. Given the strong winds we were even happier to use the protection the group afforded. This was confirmed when we briefly ran off the front of the group only to realise what an energy cost running into the wind represented. We beat a hasty retreat.

Halfway was reached in 74:24, a time I would have been quite happy with had I not been feeling increasingly uneasy about my stomach. All the more frustrating because my legs felt the best they ever have at halfway – something I would have expected running at such a comfortable pace.

At around 25km I started to feel quite unwell and shortly thereafter started to actually be sick. I will spare you the gory details but this process repeated itself every few km as I jogged my way to the finish feeling increasingly weak.

When it happened I knew 2 things –

1. The time was gone

2. I was going to finish

Pushing on when you are still in touch with your goal can be hard enough, but it becomes much more difficult when that target becomes unachievable. It is a matter of personal pride that I will never DNF a race and as such I knew that there was no decision to be made. Just to get the next 10 miles done as best I could and start the post mortem much later. It was one of the tougher experiences I have had in running. There were moments when I wanted to feel quite sorry for myself. But I was out there, still able to move forward, after a fashion and I reminded myself to be grateful for this. I crawled home in 2:38 broken on the day, but comforted by the fact that this was pure bad luck. My job now is to keep giving myself the opportunity and I am surely due at least an average day next time.”

Hayley Carruthers Represents England in the Toronto Waterfront Marathon 2018

The marathon is an opportunity for redemption. Opportunity because the outcome is uncertain. Opportunity, because it’s up to you, and only you, to make it happen.” Hayley Carruthers

After finishing First Female at the Great North Run Hayley describes her experience of being selected and running for England in the Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

“My first opportunity to compete as an international England athlete was such an exciting, overwhelming and fantastic experience and if I could do it ten times over, I would.”

“As I have only being running for 2 years, I never thought an opportunity to compete in Toronto, Canada for my third ever marathon would come along for me at all and never mind so soon.”

“I had two choices. Aim for a show-stopper performance on my England debut and put myself on the line with the risk of ‘blowing-up’ or just aim to PB and accept the time I was given. For anyone that knows me I don’t do things by halves. Yes, I doubt myself at times but who doesn’t.

When I was standing on that start line the nausea, nerves and fear set in. Why? Because I cared about the result and wanted to make sure all my training was put to good use. ”

“That pre-race confusion when your brain no longer functions.”

“As soon as the gun went off all of my nerves evaporated and I felt nothing but gratitude for the opportunity that I had been given and I was going to savour every moment. For me this meant focusing on each mile as they came and living in the present. I didn’t think about what I had done or what I had to do, but only what I was doing at that present moment. I made my choice at mile 17. I felt relaxed, smooth and energetic. I felt too good not to risk it all. So that’s what I did and I ran the last 9.2 miles as hard as I could. The result was an 11 minute PB and the most enjoyable race of my life.”

Hayley is modest and down to earth. She regularly participates in parkruns.

Behind the glamour of Race Day, we don’t see all the hard training.day in and day out.

“Building big foundations to chase those big dreams.”

You can follow Hayley on Twitter at @mileswithhayley

Hayley had Psychological Support with Prof Andy Lane, part of Winning Lane. You can follow Andy on Twitter at @AndyLane27 and partner Helen at @RunHelenLane

Future Event: The Rutland Spring Half Marathon 8th April 2018

The Rutland Spring Half Marathon, takes place on the 8th April 2018.

The Rutland Spring Half Marathon

The course offers exceptional views of the lake from Hambleton Peninsula. For those who have taken part in our September race, this course covers the section of the route half marathoners miss in our September addition of the race. Its such a lovely part of the course we wanted to give everyone an opportunity to race there.

Entries are limited to 500 so don’t miss out. You can expect the same friendly welcome, beautiful course, great feedstations, medal, t-shirt and amazing experience you’d expect from our September race.